THOSE MAGNIFICENT MEN IN THEIR FLYING MACHINES (2CD)

Label: Intrada Special Collection Volume ISC 161
Date: 1965
Time: 1:52:04
Tracks: 33
At last! Ron Goodwin's signature score makes it to CD. In fact, a 2-CD set! Lavish Ken Annakin film played as "roadshow" feature in 1965 with numerous stars: Stuart Whitman, Sarah Miles, James Fox, Terry-Thomas, Red Skelton, many others. Ron Goodwin wrote lengthy score approaching two hours, highlighted by infectious, bouncy main theme. Terrific tune features both as riotous lead vocal (in titles), primary melodic anchor for entire score. But Goodwin offers so much more! Soaring flight music, gorgeous love theme, swaggering "American western" theme, military band marches, anthems for numerous locales, snippets of familiar tunes, comic tidbits, you name it. It's a wild ride! LP from 1965 offered just 30 minutes of highlights riddled with dialog - interestingly with both stereo & mono versions containing mono tracks! Intrada proudly presents entire score in splendid stereo from actual session elements courtesy 20th Century Fox, Ron Shillingford of the Ron Goodwin estate. Every cue survives in terrific condition, including never-before-heard complete title sequence (edited before premiere of film), finale to Act I, complete intermission cue. All scoring session paperwork, spotting notes survived as well (courtesy the estate), allowing cue title assignment, editing & assembly as Goodwin intended. Highlights are many but standout is striking switch from intentional mono "tin-pan pit orchestra" intro with musician warm-up & Fox logo (for 1.37:1 ratio prologue) literally "opening up" into thrilling stereo as Todd-AO (2.20:1 ratio) opening titles take over. Effect is exhilarating! Lengthy balloon sequence (on CD 1), final flight sequences (on CD 2) are additional highlights. Nick Redman oversees production, Julie Kirgo creats informative liner notes, Joe Sikoryak designs terrific graphics using original Ronald Searle paintings to complete fun package. A major addition to library of "roadshow" soundtrack releases. Ron Goodwin conducts. Intrada Special Collection release limited to 2000 copies. SOLD OUT!

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  • More Info
  • Track List
  • Doug's Tech Talk
  • Musicians List
  • At last! Ron Goodwin's signature score makes it to CD. In fact, a 2-CD set! Lavish Ken Annakin film played as "roadshow" feature in 1965 with numerous stars: Stuart Whitman, Sarah Miles, James Fox, Terry-Thomas, Red Skelton, many others. Ron Goodwin wrote lengthy score approaching two hours, highlighted by infectious, bouncy main theme. Terrific tune features both as riotous lead vocal (in titles), primary melodic anchor for entire score. But Goodwin offers so much more! Soaring flight music, gorgeous love theme, swaggering "American western" theme, military band marches, anthems for numerous locales, snippets of familiar tunes, comic tidbits, you name it. It's a wild ride! LP from 1965 offered just 30 minutes of highlights riddled with dialog - interestingly with both stereo & mono versions containing mono tracks! Intrada proudly presents entire score in splendid stereo from actual session elements courtesy 20th Century Fox, Ron Shillingford of the Ron Goodwin estate. Every cue survives in terrific condition, including never-before-heard complete title sequence (edited before premiere of film), finale to Act I, complete intermission cue. All scoring session paperwork, spotting notes survived as well (courtesy the estate), allowing cue title assignment, editing & assembly as Goodwin intended. Highlights are many but standout is striking switch from intentional mono "tin-pan pit orchestra" intro with musician warm-up & Fox logo (for 1.37:1 ratio prologue) literally "opening up" into thrilling stereo as Todd-AO (2.20:1 ratio) opening titles take over. Effect is exhilarating! Lengthy balloon sequence (on CD 1), final flight sequences (on CD 2) are additional highlights. Nick Redman oversees production, Julie Kirgo creats informative liner notes, Joe Sikoryak designs terrific graphics using original Ronald Searle paintings to complete fun package. A major addition to library of "roadshow" soundtrack releases. Ron Goodwin conducts. Intrada Special Collection release limited to 2000 copies.
  • Play all clips

    CD 1
    01. Prologue/Titles (6:43)
    02. Follow Me/Patricia With Cycle (2:58)
    03. Beach In France/Von Holstein Exits (6:16)
    04. Japan Theme (1:16)
    05. Patricia And Orvil With Cycle (3:09)
    06. Rawnsley Drives Off/Ornithopter/Telescope (7:26)
    07. 'Frere Jacques' (0:34)
    08. Richard's Hangar (2:54)
    09. 'Dolly Gray' (0:42)
    10. Patricia In Restaurant (3:26)
    11. Demoiselle Take-Off (1:00)
    12. Runaway Plane (4:20)
    13. Orvil's Hangar (0:51)
    14. Cliffs Of Dover/Strauss Waltz (2:45)
    15. Von Holstein Into Sea (3:32)
    16. It's Yamamoto (0:30)
    17. Patricia Walks To Orvil/I Absolutely Forbid It (4:44)
    18. Orvil Romances (2:56)
    19. The Marseillaise/Balloon Sequence (7:01)
    20. End Act I (0:40)
    CD 1 Total Time: 64:13

    CD 2
    01. Intermission Music (5:47)
    02. Crowds Arrive (1:54)
    03. The Competitors (2:08)
    04. Yamamoto Crash/Demoiselle Takes Off/Ponticelli At Convent (4:48)
    05. Mother Superior/Richard To Dover (5:21)
    06. On To Scotland/Marine Hotel (1:24)
    07. Rawnsley's Boat (0:38)
    08. Unloading Boat/All Ashore (2:11)
    09. Von Holstein And Seagull/Sir Percy Away/Boxkite/Avro With Train/Pierre Through Haystack (9:51)
    10. French Band (2:38)
    11. Lonchamps/Three Planes Flying (1:50)
    12. 'Rule Britannia'/Ponticelli Rolls Plane/Band: The Marseillaise (3:01)
    13. Pierre Sees Betty/Finish Of Race/End Of Picture (5:56)
    CD 2 Total Time: 47:51

  • Tech Talk From The Producer…

    The main theme from Those Magnificent Men In Their Flying Machines has become Ron Goodwin’s musical signature. It highlighted his numerous concert appearances and arguably remains his most popular composition. The melody, played either with lyrics or without, literally sticks with you after a single viewing of the film.

    Interestingly, when the film was first premiered as a “roadshow” feature in 1965, the 20th Century-Fox album taken from the soundtrack contained less than 30 minutes from a score running close to two hours, with dialog highlights spread throughout the record as filler. It was less an album of the score and more a concept project, in fact, simply a half hour audio souvenir of the movie experience as produced by Bernie Wayne, then-director of Artists and Repertoire for the label. Adding insult to injury, though issued in both mono and stereo versions, many of the selections appeared in mono only, no matter what their respective jacket covers stated. But the packaging at least offered that great Ronald Searle campaign artwork.

    For this premiere presentation of the complete score, Intrada was able to locate—with the considerable efforts of Ron Shillingsford of the Ron Goodwin Estate and James Fitzpatrick of Tadlow Music—the unedited original ¼” two-track stereo session mixes. Happily these full stereo masters were in terrific shape and contained everything Goodwin recorded, including the “Prologue,” finale to Act I, intermission music, full end credit playout music, complete background score, all of the various international anthems and band marches, snippets of Offenbach, Strauss, Wagner and more. These cues were recorded when Goodwin was scoring a completed picture stopping just short of 17 reels (almost 3 hours long), before everything was trimmed down. Cues like the prologue and opening titles saw several bars dropped or moved about to shorten their length and many other cues were similarly truncated throughout the film. Our 2-CD set happily presents every cue in full-length manner as written and recorded.

    Typically we might assign the various marches and other similar source pieces to an “extras” section but in this case Goodwin incorporated most of these cues right into the very fabric of his original score, moving rapidly from one familiar quote to his own music and back again with comedic abandon. Thusly, the overall architecture of his complete score can best be fully appreciated only by hearing all of these ideas intact, appearing where they were originally intended. From Goodwin to Offenbach, from Wagner to Goodwin, from Goodwin to Strauss… from military bands playing familiar melodies to sweeping flight music, from rollicking chase music and back again… it’s a grand, rousing, tuneful, musical rollercoaster with Ron Goodwin in the pilot’s seat.

    The paperwork accompanying the master elements included highly detailed cue sheet information made in 1965 at the sessions for the music editors to work with. Goodwin and his engineer described the cues in broad terms rather than assigning exact cue titles, identifying precisely where each cue would enter and exit in the picture. Additionally, Goodwin wrote the numerous individual cues with an unusually strong feel for overall musical continuity. Some cues were separated by mere sentences of dialog during a scene and Goodwin often maintained similar or complimentary key centers to ensure a smooth musical feel, especially when making longer assemblies out of shorter pieces.

    A few additional words about the “Prologue” music are in order. Scored intentionally with an old-time “pit orchestra” sound to accompany the comedy prelude of Red Skelton and other early fliers stretching their wings, Goodwin conducted this one sequence (including Alfred Newman’s iconic Fox logo music) with the playing in a somewhat ragged manner right down to the opening “warm-up” of the musicians. This one cue was intentionally recorded in mono only by the composer (with minimal stereo reverb) to mimic the 1.37:1 aspect ratio of the opening black and white, pseudo-documentary images. When the sequence ends, the music literally “opens up” into full stereo as the screen images themselves open up with the full Todd-AO 70mm 2.2:1 ratio for the main titles. The effect is exhilarating.

    And now one last comment about the sequencing of our program: the first CD runs considerably longer than the second disc and reflects the separation of the two acts of the picture. This enables us to retain Goodwin’s musical architecture with the changing of the discs matching the two parts of the movie.

    So now it’s time to sit back in the safety of your own flying contraption (or at least a comfortable chair) and soar with a magnificent assemblage of musical merriment, scored by a master in the craft of melody—no matter what century you’re in!

    —Douglass Fake