TOBRUK

Label: Intrada Special Collection Volume ISC 147
Date: 1967
Time: 0:35:31
Tracks: 18
World premiere release of action-filled Bronislau Kaper score for 1967 Universal Pictures WWII tale starring Rock Hudson, George Peppard. Intrada presents complete score from Arthur Hiller film, newly mixed & mastered in full stereo from actual multi-track session masters housed in perfect condition in Universal vaults. Kaper creates dynamic main theme, then surrounds with array of action cues, desert warfare suspense sequences. Writing near end of illustrious career, Kaper ventures into thrilling territory of celebrated MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY, giving much weight to brass section of orchestra, then concludes with powerful finish... in fact with three (!) endings, including finale of film, "End Cast" plus brief coda for Universal Studios tour invitation attached to film prints in theaters. Exciting 1967 artwork campaign plus stills, liner notes by Julie Kirgo round out package. More stereo soundtrack excitement from Universal's previously unreleased 1960's treasure chest. Bronislau Kaper composes, Joseph Gershenson conducts. SOLD OUT!

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  • More Info
  • Track List
  • Doug's Tech Talk
  • Musicians List
  • World premiere release of action-filled Bronislau Kaper score for 1967 Universal Pictures WWII tale starring Rock Hudson, George Peppard. Intrada presents complete score from Arthur Hiller film, newly mixed & mastered in full stereo from actual multi-track session masters housed in perfect condition in Universal vaults. Kaper creates dynamic main theme, then surrounds with array of action cues, desert warfare suspense sequences. Writing near end of illustrious career, Kaper ventures into thrilling territory of celebrated MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY, giving much weight to brass section of orchestra, then concludes with powerful finish... in fact with three (!) endings, including finale of film, "End Cast" plus brief coda for Universal Studios tour invitation attached to film prints in theaters. Exciting 1967 artwork campaign plus stills, liner notes by Julie Kirgo round out package. More stereo soundtrack excitement from Universal's previously unreleased 1960's treasure chest. Bronislau Kaper composes, Joseph Gershenson conducts.
  • Play all clips

    01. Main Title/Prologue (2:46)
    02. Frognapped (2:32)
    03. Rendezvous (0:43)
    04. Desert Convoy/Prepare For Attack (3:42)
    05. Harker's Humor (1:22)
    06. Mine Field (1:33)
    07. Sitting Duck (1:01)
    08. Taureg Trade/Caravan Continues (2:02)
    09. Night Camp (0:54)

    10. Traitor Of The Tunnel (1:40)
    11. Exit Portman (3:19)
    12. Head Hunters (3:34)
    13. Many Tanks (0:43)
    14. The Big Dump (1:38)
    15. The Guns Of Mersa (0:55)
    16. Shalom (1:47)
    17. Bergman's Death (2:40)
    18. End Title/End Cast/Emblem (2:00)

  • Tech Talk From The Producer…

    Bronislau Kaper approached the scoring of Tobruk as a large musical block of cement backed by massive guns —just like the formidable German fortress under assault by the Allies during WWII that inspired this rousing action picture. His primary theme is weighted by a barrage of brass, eight angular notes seemingly chiseled out of concrete and layered throughout the entire score in blocks. Numerous other motifs play a role but Kaper seldom strays from his main Tobruk theme, an idea whose dominance mirrors the towering objective under siege by the Allies.

    For this premiere presentation of the soundtrack on CD, Intrada was generously given access to all of the multi-track master elements recorded at Universal Picture’s scoring stage in February of 1967 under the supervision of Joseph Gershenson. The ½” 15 i.p.s. threetrack stereo session masters were vaulted in magnificent condition, allowing us to create brand new two-track stereo mixes of every cue. The results are vibrant and robust. As is our customary policy, we have not attempted to apply any of the various “noise reduction” programs in use today to address any of the original analog tape hiss. No matter how good this artificial audio processing may be, it always removes something from the ambience of the actual recording and seemingly squeezes the life out of the recordings themselves, even when applied sparingly. Basically, we find little reason to try and make tapes nearly a half-century old sound like contemporary digital recordings —especially when they are as crisp and dynamic and in such good condition as these masters were. It is truly a cause for celebration when we can reach back nearly fifty years and find master elements in perfect shape, their contents complete and properly identified and just waiting for our attention. We were happy to oblige.

    We have presented the complete score in the original slated sequence of the picture. While it is relatively brief by current standards, the producers of the film gained extra mileage by editing and re-tracking certain cues multiple times throughout the picture. For example, a long portion of “Head Hunters” is used early in the film, following the “Frognapped” sequence that opens the drama. However, it is heard again in the film where it was intended, following “Exit Portman” when the Allied caravan posing as a German troop transport with prisoners is shadowed by real German adversaries unaware of the ruse. Another example occurs with “Rendezvous,” which actually plays as intended after the tracked version of “Head Hunters” during the opening. It is later edited and tracked into a sequence right before “Night Camp.” We have, of course, not made any attempts to mirror these often jarring post-production edits and repetitions and are presenting every cue in complete form, in the sequence it was designed for.

    One final note. Bronislau Kaper was a genuine composer from an era when finishing a score at the end of a film with a concluding piece of music was as customary as having an author write a final chapter to his story before its publication—a creative and artistic talent sorely absent with today’s film making. For Tobruk, the composer supplied three such endings and all of them appear at the conclusion of the film. In explanation: Kaper finishes the score proper with a triumphant statement of his main theme (“End Title”), then follows with a brief summary of the score (“End Cast”). But in those days, Universal often added an “Emblem” at the very end of prints, inviting Southern California tourists to visit Universal Studios. For this ultimate coda, Kaper adds yet one more conclusive statement of his main theme, wrapping everything up with a single declamatory farewell to his eight-note idea, now built entirely out of major chords. It’s a spectacular finish for a composer writing near the end of his own legendary career.

    So sit back and let composer Bronislau Kaper, conductor Joseph Gershenson and the Universal Pictures orchestra win the epic battle of Tobruk… all for your listening pleasure!

    —Douglass Fake



  • Composed by Bronislau Kaper and Conducted by Joseph Gershenson.
    Recorded in February 1967, at Universal Pictures Scoring Stage.

    This soundtrack was produced in cooperation with the
    American Federation of Musicians of the United States and Canada.


    VIOLIN/VIOLA
    Israel Baker
    Myer Bello
    Manuel Compinsky
    Sam Cytron
    Joseph DiFiore
    Cecil Figelski
    Samuel Freed, Jr.
    Joseph Gershenson
    Philip Goldberg
    Anatol V. Kaminsky
    Murray Kellner
    Lou Klass
    Virginia Majewski
    Randolph M. Moss
    Erno Neufeld
    Lou Raderman
    Sally Raderman
    Joseph Reilich
    Paul Robyn
    Ambrose Russo
    Albert Steinberg

    CELLO
    Elizabeth Greenschpoon
    Raphael Kramer
    Edgar Lustgarten
    Nino Rosso
    Eleanor Slatkin
    Joseph Ullstein
    William Vandenburg


    BASS
    Mario Camposano
    Milton Kestenbaum

    WOODWINDS
    Norman Lloyd Benno
    Frederick G. Cooper, Jr.
    Arthur Gleghorn
    Lloyd W. Hildebrand
    John Neufeld
    Ray M. Nowlin
    Hugo P. Raimondi
    Blake D. Reynolds
    Ethmer C. Roten
    Gordon S. Schoneberg
    Arthur C. Smith

    FRENCH HORN
    James A. Decker
    Richard E. Perissi
    Gale H. Robinson
    Claude E. Sherry

    TRUMPET
    Emanuel Klein
    Raymond S. Linn
    Manuel Stevens

    TROMBONE
    Milton Bernhart
    Harold Diner
    Francis L. Howard
    George M. Roberts
    Lloyd E. Ulyate


    TUBA
    John Bambridge, Sr.

    HARP
    Dorothy S. Remsen

    PIANO
    Caesar Giovannini

    GUITAR
    Robert F. Bain

    DRUMS/PERCUSSION
    Ralph S. Collier
    Frank Flynn
    Milton Holland
    Louis Singer
    John F. Williams, Sr.

    ARRANGER/ORCHESTRATOR
    COPYIST/OTHER

    Louis Martin Behm
    Wally B. Heglin
    Albert Lisi
    Louis J. Passarelli
    Leonid V. Raab
    Milton S. Rosen
    Alvin Z. Seigel
    David N. Tamkin